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Arugula Salad with Melon and Prosciutto Recipe

Arugula – you say “bitter”, I say beautifully versatile

This beautiful green is a summer leaf that is slightly bitter to taste but gorgeous to look at. While I do not eat this leaf alone, it is a fabulous foil to so many ingredients. The sweet fruits of summer along with a salty surprise brings out the pepper in the arugula. Arugula is a gorgeous leaf to brighten up any summer salad or even as a plating vegetable. Use Arugula to brighten up the flavor profiles of the fruits of summer!! Enjoy!!

Your Chef, Lara


Arugula Salad with Melon and Prosciutto

Serves 4 (serving size: 1 cup)



  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 4 cups arugula
  • 1 cup thinly sliced peeled cantaloupe
  • 2 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto



Place olive oil, balsamic vinegar, and Dijon mustard in a medium bowl, stirring with a whisk until well combined. Add arugula to oil mixture; toss to coat greens. Top arugula mixture with cantaloupe and prosciutto.


Inspired by a recipe from: 401.737.5413


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MEMBER MADE: Fermented Hot Sauce Recipe

Member Made Demo: How to Make Hot Sauce!

By Urban Greens Food Co-op Member Phil Trevvett


How to Make Hot Sauce!


Making tabasco-style hot sauce is a simple but slow process.  There are only a few main steps, and a lot of waiting.  But the end result is worth it!  Once you get familiar with the process, the most important things to remember are to be patient, and to be careful handling the chillies!


We’ll break down the process into the three main activities:

1) Creating the pepper & brine ‘mash’ that will be aged

2) Blending the mash and straining our skin and seeds

3) Finishing for taste.



Creating the Mash

--This is the initial preparation of the chili peppers for fermentation


1) Wash the peppers: for any process of aging/fermenting food, make sure you’re dealing with clean ingredients.


2) PUT ON RUBBER GLOVES! - These chili peppers are hot, so make sure you’re wearing gloves while working with them.


3) Cut stems off peppers, and cut peppers into quarters and place in mixing bowl.  (You can cut them into smaller pieces if preferred).


4) Add salt, at an approximate ratio of ½ cup of salt to ½ gallon of peppers (OR: 4 Tablespoons to 1 Quart, or 2 Tablespoons to 1 Pint).

REMEMBER: peppers look bigger before they’re pressed down, so a half gallon may look like much more than a half gallon.


5) Using a spoon, or a glove-covered hand, mix the peppers and salt until peppers all seem moist and coated with salt.


6) Transfer peppers to fermenting container.  Compress Mash as much as possible, and add additional brine water to make sure peppers are submerged.


7) WAIT.




From the Mash to the Pepper Juice.


8) Empty the pepper mash into a blender.  Blend it!  It should begin to look a lot like a smoothie.


9) Strain the blended mash, either through a strainer or using a food mill.  this should remove any bits of skin and seed that remain.


Finishing to Taste!

--This process depends on personal taste, but also involves some basic steps that are key for preserving your product.

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July Member Made Demo: How to Make Hot Sauce

July Member Made Demo: 
How to Make Hot Sauce!

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July Recipe: Fiddleheads!



Fiddleheads Ferms

I was only recently turned onto Fiddlehead Ferns but now that I have there is no going back. Their season is very short however so you have to grab the ferns by the frond now! Fiddlehead Ferns are the baby leaves of the fern plant – if left alone they become the frond of a fern. Fiddleheads have antioxidant activity, are a source of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and are high in iron and fibre.


You do need to make sure that you blanch your Fiddleheads before you cook them. Undercooked Fiddleheads can make you slightly sick and can be slightly woody. Cook correctly, however, they are fabulous to both eat and look at! 


Your Chef, Lara

Wild Fiddlehead Fern and Muchroom Saute



o   2 oz. extra virgin olive oil


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